Set as Homepage..

  Bookmark this site..

   Subscribe RSS

  Join me at Facebook

  LinkedIn Profile

Urdu Version

 

Welcome..

Nothing special just only web presence, here I gathered some information regarding myself and my work, I am not professional website developer so don't expect a professional quality business level website :)

I request to you to kindly visit my blog and let me know how it is and yes if you have some thing to share through it, I will be very much happy to included your article, news, update, even job opportunities information.

Linked In

Click here to visit my linked in profile that is not complete but some day I will done it ...

Blog.. Blog.. Blog..

 

19 Ways to Build Physical Security into a Data Center

 

Continue..

11. Use plenty of cameras. Surveillance cameras should be installed around the perimeter of the building, at all entrances and exits, and at every access point throughout the building. A combination of motion-detection devices, low-light cameras, pan-tilt-zoom cameras and standard fixed cameras is ideal. Footage should be digitally recorded and stored offsite.


12. Protect the building's machinery. Keep the mechanical area of the building, which houses environmental systems and uninterruptible power supplies, strictly off limits. If generators are outside, use concrete walls to secure the area. For both areas, make sure all contractors and repair crews are accompanied by an employee at all times.


13. Plan for secure air handling. Make sure the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems can be set to re circulate air rather than drawing in air from the outside. This could help protect people and equipment if there were some kind of biological or chemical attack or heavy smoke spreading from a nearby fire. For added security, put devices in place to monitor the air for chemical, biological or radiological contaminant.


14. Ensure nothing can hide in the walls and ceilings. In secure areas of the data center, make sure internal walls run from the slab ceiling all the way to subflooring where wiring is typically housed. Also make sure drop-down ceilings don't provide hidden access points.


15. Use two-factor authentication. Biometric identification is becoming standard for access to sensitive areas of data centers, with hand geometry or fingerprint scanners usually considered less invasive than retinal scanning. In other areas, you may be able to get away with less-expensive access cards.


16. Harden the core with security layers. Anyone entering the most secure part of the data center will have been authenticated at least three times, including:
a. At the outer door. Don't forget you'll need a way for visitors to buzz the front desk.
b. At the inner door. Separates visitor area from general employee area.
c. At the entrance to the "data" part of the data center. Typically, this is the layer that has the strictest "positive control," meaning no piggybacking allowed. For implementation, you have two options:
1. A floor-to-ceiling turnstile. If someone tries to sneak in behind an authenticated user, the door gently revolves in the reverse direction. (In case of a fire, the walls of the turnstile flatten to allow quick egress.)
2. A "mantrap." Provides alternate access for equipment and for persons with disabilities. This consists of two separate doors with an airlock in between. Only one door can be opened at a time, and authentication is needed for both doors.
d. At the door to an individual computer processing room. This is for the room where actual servers, mainframes or other critical IT equipment is located. Provide access only on an as-needed basis, and segment these rooms as much as possible in order to control and track access.


17. Watch the exits too. Monitor entrance and exit—not only for the main facility but for more sensitive areas of the facility as well. It'll help you keep track of who was where when. It also helps with building evacuation if there's a fire.


18. Prohibit food in the computer rooms. Provide a common area where people can eat without getting food on computer equipment.


19. Install visitor rest rooms. Make sure to include bathrooms for use by visitors and delivery people who don't have access to the secure parts of the building.


<< Previous Page

 

Back / Home

 

Note:  atifkamal.com provides information here for illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied. This includes, but is not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.